Home

Great Pacific Garbage Patch from space

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a collection of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. Marine debris is litter that ends up in oceans, seas, and other large bodies of water. . The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also known as the Pacific trash vortex, spans waters from the West Coast of North America to Japan. The patch is actually comprised of the Western Garbage Patch, located near Japan. Satellites reveal ocean microplastic fluctuation in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and releases from the Yangtze River in China. An estimated eight million tons of plastic trash enters the ocean each year, and most of it is battered by sun and waves into microplastics—tiny flecks that can ride currents hundreds or thousands of miles from their point of entry The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the world's largest collection of floating trash—and the most famous. It lies between Hawaii and California and is often described as larger than Texas, even though it contains not a square foot of surface on which to stand. It cannot be seen from space, as is often claimed The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the size of Texas and you can see it from space! Not so much. Since the garbage patches are constantly moving and mixing with winds and ocean currents, their size continuously changes. They can be very large, but since they're made up primarily of microplastic debris, they definitely can't be seen from space Garbage patches are large areas of marine debris concentration that are formed by rotating ocean currents called gyres - kind of like big whirlpools that suck things in. A garbage patch is made up of tiny plastic pieces called microplastics that are less than 5 millimeters long. It's more like pepper flakes swirling in a soup than something you can skim off the surface

Often, the areas of accumulation are due to prevailing local water currents and convergence zones, with the Great Pacific Garbage Patch being the most extreme example. What makes the plumes from major river mouths noteworthy is that they are a source into the ocean, as opposed to places where the microplastics tend to accumulate, Ruf said

Great Pacific Garbage Patch National Geographic Societ

The most notable one is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch between Hawaii and San Francisco in the North Pacific. This is a worldwide problem of huge proportions. So much so that in the last episode of Blue Planet II, David Attenborough gave a harrowing speech about the impact plastic is having in marine life The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the world's largest collection of floating trash—and the most famous. It lies between Hawaii and California and is often described as larger than Texas. The Great Pacific garbage patch (also Pacific trash vortex) is a garbage patch, a gyre of marine debris particles, in the central North Pacific Ocean.It is located roughly from 135°W to 155°W and 35°N to 42°N. The collection of plastic and floating trash originates from the Pacific Rim, including countries in Asia, North America, and South America. The gyre is divided into two areas, the. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch A shocking photograph shows ocean debris directly resulting from the massive 2011 earthquake in Japan, not specifically the 'Great Pacific Garbage Patch.' The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is the largest of the five offshore plastic accumulation zones in the world's oceans. It is located halfway between Hawaii and California. PLASTIC ACCUMULATION. It is estimated that 1.15 to 2.41 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean each year from rivers

Tracking Ocean Microplastics From Space - See the Great

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is soupy zone of plastic accumulation twice the size of Texas that floats halfway between Hawaii and California. It cannot be seen by space walkers, and people who attempt to walk on it will sink right through. The history of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch paints a more complicated picture The garbage patch is a popular name for concentrations of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. While Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a term often used by the media, it does not paint an accurate picture of the marine debris problem in the North Pacific ocean. Marine debris concentrates in various regions of the North Pacific, not just. A major plastic accumulation zone is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), the world's largest zone of accumulated plastic among five (refer to the figure below). Located in the North Pacific Ocean, between Hawaii and California, the GPGP covers an area of approximately 1.6 million km 2 (The Ocean Cleanup, n.d.)

Can you see the Pacific garbage patch from space

  1. Below the Great Pacific Garbage Patch: More Garbage . New research is finding there's more to marine debris than just what appears near the ocean surface, including tons of microplastics.
  2. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a concentration of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean — the exact size and mass of which is unknown and difficult to measure. It is formed by trash and trash particles that found their way into the North Pacific Ocean and is the world's largest collection of plastic in an ocean
  3. How much garbage is in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? This large island of floating garbage was already noticed in the 1980s. Since then, it has grown exponentially in size and with speeding tempos to an extent that it now covers an area of 1.6 million square kilometers!That's more than twice the size of Texas

Massive garbage patch. About 15 years after first discovering the great Pacific garbage patch, Capt. Charles Moore returned in 2014 and discovered that semi-permanent islands made of ropes, buoys. 9. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch lies within that massive area. Interestingly, the central area is very calm and is the place where the oceanic debris is stuck. 10. What really happens is any garbage that is outside the circular current system slowly sucks in the debris and pushes it right in the calm central area Plastic pollution in the ocean is a massive -- and growing -- problem. Midway Atoll, a remote island situated on the edge of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is covered with plastic debris swept.

After hearing about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch earlier this year — an area the size of Texas in the Pacific Ocean filled with trash — I went looking for it on Google Earth The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a massive dump of floating garbage in the Pacific Ocean. We contribute to it everyday by littering and using un-biodegrada..

Satellites reveal ocean microplastic fluctuation in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and releases from the Yangtze River in China. An estimated eight million tons of plastic trash enters the ocean each year, and most of it is battered by sun and waves into microplastics—tiny flecks that can ride currents hundreds or thousands of miles from The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a swirling mass of marine debris, a Plastic Soup of discarded bags and bottles, in the north-east of the Pacific Ocean, wh.. 6. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch contains between 1.1 to 3.6 trillion pieces of plastic. When exposed to sunlight, plastic breaks into smaller and smaller pieces, until they are classed as microplastics. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch contains a staggering number of pieces of plastic, estimated to be between 1.1 to 3.6 trillion Recycled in our food A relatively-recent discovery, the effect of some ocean currents around the world is to corral floating man-made debris into a concentrated area. The Great Pacific garbage patch, lying between Japan and the west coast of North.. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Friday, July 16, 2021 by Pia Poblete. In an Earth plentiful of space and natural resources, it's easy to forget the environmental impact of something as small as plastic. Yet, we continue to use plastic every day

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? The name is relatively self-explanatory: the Great Pacific garbage patch or the Pacific trash vortex is literally a garbage accumulation consisting of marine debris and other litter that has settled in the middle of the northern Pacific Ocean.. The patch originates from the Pacific rim or the surrounding landmasses that border the ocean I heard that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the size of Texas and you can see it from space! Since the garbage patches are constantly moving and mixing with winds and ocean currents, their size continuously changes. They can be very large, but since they're made up primarily of microplastic debris, they definitely can't be seen from space Investigating Plastic Detection from Space. After almost 3 years of work, The Ocean Cleanup research team has recently submitted its comprehensive results about plastic pollution in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. More than 1.2 million pieces of plastic have been collected, counted, sorted, characterized and categorized Myth 3: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is visible from space. Even though it's huge, you can't see it via satellite. Much of the debris is made up of plastic, which breaks down into small nurdles. They float near the surface but because they're all separate pieces, it's difficult to see them

Great Pacific Garbage Patch - National Geographic Society

Debunking the Myths about Garbage Patches response

The History and Future of The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. In 1997, racing boat captain Charles Moore made an unfortunate discovery in one of the most remote parts of the world. Returning from a trans-Pacific race, he and his crew were met by an undulating trash heap, with plastic junk bobbing in the ocean for as far as the eye could see Modelled and measured mass concentration in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP). ( a ) Ocean plastic mass concentrations for August 2015, as predicted by our data-calibrated model The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is part of the five offshore plastic accumulation zones in the world's oceans and is located halfway between Hawaii and California. It covers an approximate.

UPDATED FEB. 27, 2019 — While everything may be bigger in Texas, some reports about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch would lead you to believe that this marine mass of plastic is bigger than Texas—maybe twice as big as the Lone Star State, or even twice as big as the continental U.S. For NOAA, a national science agency, separating science from science fiction about the Pacific garbage patch. Plastic pollution in the ocean is a massive -- and growing -- problem. Midway Atoll, a remote island situated on the edge of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, is covered with plastic debris swept.

The plain fact is: there is no Great Pacific Garbage Patch. It is a myth, an ecological boogeyman. There is no Texas sized pile of plastic floating around in a whirlpool of doom, as even its supposed discoverer Capt. Moore was forced to admit, there's NO trash dump.. But the crew from VICE never draws this conclusion The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Flows Like Gravy Other various misimpressions of the GPGP include the fact that it is an island of garbage of all kinds in the middle of the ocean, so thick you could walk upon it, deposited by straw-drinkers and plastic-bag carriers from all over the world More than eight million tonnes of plastics enters the world's oceans every year. Animals are getting caught in nets, ropes, plastic beverage rings that cause them to be captured and stuck and not able to move freely. Animals also eat the trash an.. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Researchers found that the global microplastic concentrations were varying seasonally with peaking in the North Atlantic and Pacific during the Northern Hemisphere. The patch cannot be seen from space, as is sometimes claimed. Making things more complicated, the location of the patch can vary over time, depending on the time of year. 3. Fishing nets account for around 45% of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch Almost half of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is made up of abandoned or lost fishing nets

The largest patch of plastic is located somewhere between California and Hawaii in the North Pacific Gyre and it is usually referred to as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP). The estimated size spans a surface area roughly three times that of France and two times that of Texas: 1.6 million square kilometers Also known as the Pacific Trash Vortex, The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the world's most famous and the largest floating trash patch located in a massive expanse (coordinates: approximately from 35°N to 42°N and 135°W to 155°W) in the central North Pacific Ocean. It's essentially a collection of monstrous trash islands composed. Tracking Ocean Microplastics From Space - See the Great Pacific Garbage Patch Like Never Before; Tracking Ocean Microplastics From Space - See the Great Pacific Garbage Patch Like Never Before. scitechdaily.com - Gabe Cherry, University of Michigan • 10h The Great Pacific Garbage Patch stretches across a swath of the North Pacific Ocean, forming a nebulous, floating junk yard on the high seas. It's the poster child for a worldwide problem: plastic. Huge Garbage Patch Found in Atlantic Too. Akin to the Texas-size garbage patch in the Pacific, a massive trash vortex has formed from billion of bits of plastic congregating off North America's.

The Growth of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Shania Nair. March 2, 2020. Introduction: For this project, I'm going to be researching the growth of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and what impact the United States has on it. The Vortex of debris known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch can be found in between California and Hawaii In fact, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch was barely visible, since it comprised mostly micro-garbage. It can't be scanned by satellites, or scoped out on Google Earth. You could be sailing right. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch accumulates so much debris through what is known as the Pacific Trash Vortex, spanning from the West coast of North America to the West coast of Japan. It is comprised of two subcategories of the Western Garbage patch, located near Japan, and the Eastern Garbage patch, which is located between the states of. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch also known as the Pacific Trash Vortex is a gyre filled with rubbish and thrown away fishing and boat resources. It is located in the Great Pacific Ocean Between Hawaii and California. It is estimated that this garbage patch is the size of Texas. Different explorers think of it to be different sizes because there. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP), a site of marine debris considered to be twice the size of Texas, is perhaps the foremost expression of the impact of plastic waste on our world and the.

There’s a Horrifying Amount of Plastic in the Ocean

TRASH TALK: What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

  1. Browse 109 the great pacific garbage patch stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. Ocean Cleanup's System 001 is towed out of the San Francisco Bay in San Francisco, California on September 08, 2018
  2. Live. •. ALAMEDA — An innovative system aimed at sweeping up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — a massive vortex of plastic drifting between California and Hawaii — will be launched.
  3. Season changes in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch The team found that global microplastic concentrations tend to vary by season, peaking in the North Atlantic and Pacific during the Northern.
  4. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is one of many areas in the ocean where marine debris naturally concentrates because of ocean currents. In this episode, Dianna Parker from the NOAA Marine Debris Program explains what a garbage patch is and isn't, what we know and don't know, and what we can do about this ocean-sized problem
  5. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, however, is not just one big island of trash. Instead it consists of a western and eastern patch containing many small and large patches, some being up to 15 meters long. There is a larger current that moves trash back and forth from the western and eastern patch called the Subtropical Convergence Zone (C zone)
  6. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) floats, swirls, and grows in the North Pacific between Hawaii and the coast of North America. It is 1.6 million kilometers around (about 1 million miles), which is three times the size of France and two times the size of Texas
  7. What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch? Across the vast spaces of our world's oceans are five zones known as gyres which act as enormous, but slow-moving whirlpools circulating our planet's water around the world. There are gyres in the North and South Pacific, the Indian Ocean, and the North and South Atlantic

Firearm Discussion and Resources from AR-15, AK-47, Handguns and more! Buy, Sell, and Trade your Firearms and Gear The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the world's largest collection of floating trash—and the most famous. It lies between Hawaii and California and is often described as larger than Texas, even though it contains not a square foot of surface on which to stand The team found that global microplastic concentrations tend to vary by season, peaking in the North Atlantic and Pacific during the Northern Hemisphere's summer months. June and July, for example, are the peak months for the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a convergence zone in the North Pacific where microplastic collects in massive quantities The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also described as the Pacific Trash Vortex, is a gyre of marine litter in the central North Pacific Ocean. The patch extends over an indeterminate area, with estimates ranging very widely depending on the degree of plastic concentration used to define the affected area

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Isn't What You Think It Is

Direct contractor cheapest professional price for renovation. 3 mins ·. Satellites reveal ocean microplastic fluctuation in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and releases from the Yangtze River in China. An estimated eight million tons of plastic trash enters the ocean each year, and most of it is battered by sun and waves into microplastics. The so-called Great Pacific Garbage Patch covers roughly 618,000 square miles and consists of 79,000 tons of plastic. Also known as trash island, this gigantic patch of garbage is made up of plastic that has been blown, dumped, or otherwise deposited into the sea over the years Case Study: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. particles as food, causing stomach obstruction and death in seabirds (The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, 2017). Consequently, plastic debris is a causing factor in the decline of the endangered Tristan Albatross and Northern Royal Albatross (Harmful marine debris, 2003) The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the popular name for an area in the North Pacific Ocean, between Hawaii and California, containing a high concentration of marine debris. Most of the debris in the Garbage Patch is thought to be small plastic pieces, not always visible to the naked eye

The disjointed mass of waste is known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Space debris is extremely dangerous, says Rebecca Allen, an astrophysicist with the Swinburne Center for. Environmentalists managed to pull 40 tons of plastic from a huge collection of marine debris which has come to be known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Volunteers with the California-based nonprofit Ocean Voyages Institute returned last month from a 25-day expedition in which they ventured out on a 140-foot (43 metres) cargo sailboat fitted. Instead, the Garbage Patch is composed of tiny plastic bits that linger unseen beneath the surface, ranging in size from a few square inches to barely visible specks. Captain Charles Moore was the first to notice the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in 1997. Then a racing boat captain, he was sailing from Hawaii to southern California when he. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also described as the Pacific Trash Vortex, is a gyre of marine litter in the central North Pacific Ocean. but if this garbage island that can be seen from space I'm sure we would have all seen satellite or even aerial photoes of it by now. I'm sure that garbage photo is of a dump somewhere and not of the.

Roughly located in an area between 135° to 155°W and 35° to 42°N, much of the world's trash has accumulated in this part of the Pacific Ocean based on the movement of ocean currents. It's also called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the Pacific Trash Gyre, and the Pacific Trash Vortex Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a zone in the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and California that has a high concentration of plastic waste.The extent of the patch has been compared to the U.S. state of Texas or Alaska or even to the country of Afghanistan.. Garbage that reaches the ocean from the west coast of the United States and from the east coast of Japan is carried by currents—including the.

Tracking ocean microplastics from space - Engineering

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch doesn't exist, not in the sense you are thinking. The name garbage patch may conjure up an image of a gigantic bouillabaisse of floating trash: empty soda bottles, soggy cast-off clothing, old pizza boxes. It's nothing of the kind. The garbage consists of tiny plastic particles, too small or almost too small. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is mostly composed of plastics that float. According to the same study cited by Seaspiracy, only about 60% of the plastic is capable of floating. A portion of. When we imagine the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a massive oceanic gyre of plastic that has taken over a part of the world's largest ocean, the mental images that come to mind are a sea of plastic. Ben Lecomte, a long-distance swimmer, swam the Great Pacific Garbage Patch from Hawaii to California to draw attention to plastic pollution. This is his Call to Earth The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is taking up an area of the ocean that is roughly two times the size of Texas! The plastics, which are not biodegradable , break down over time into tiny pieces. The plastic pieces, which are not visible from space, or even from a sailboat at times because they are beneath the ocean surface, are exposed to.

According to the UN environmental programme, the great Pacific garbage patch is growing so fast that it, like the Great Wall of China, is becoming visible from space The Truth About the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. To restate the above point in terms of the Great Pacific Patch specifically: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the North Pacific Ocean isn't a singular plastic island or garbage patch floating above the water that is visible by the naked eye (like some media sometimes insinuates in.

Cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch with help from

  1. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, showing locations of western and eastern patches, courtesy of NOAA. Modeling results can be coupled with the deployment of active or emerging passive technologies for remediation, or in the future, for prevention of debris inflow into waterways and oceans
  2. Trash from the coast of North America takes about six years to reach the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, while trash from Japan and other Asian countries takes about a year. The remaining 20 percent of debris in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch comes from boaters, offshore oil rigs and large cargo ships that dump or lose debris directly into the water
  3. The Plastic Soup, also known as Garbage Soup, Great Pacific garbage patch or the Pacific Trash Vortex is a completely covered area of marine debris particles located in the center of North Pacific Ocean. It has a size of about 1,400,000 km². That is why it is also called the seventh continent, because it is larger than many countries. YouTube
  4. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a gyre of 160 million pounds of floating plastic trash situated between Hawaii and California, continues to grow. But how can we visualize the scale of this environmental problem? Riley Brady, a a PhD student from the University of Colorado who studies ocean biogeochemistry, created a fascinating high-res ocean model simulation that he posted on Reddit which.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch Is Bigger and Mostly Made of

Woman Sails the Great Pacific Garbage Patch with Plastic

Great Pacific garbage patch - Wikipedi

Their video proves this is a load of bunk. The idea that the great Pacific garbage patch can appear and disappear with the seasons and switch from one ocean to another following the sun is so stupid that it proves this method can do nothing at all. It is clearly a false correlation based on a seasonal dependency of roughness The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Is Not What You Think It Is It's not an island twice the size of Texas. But it is severely impacting marine ecosystems and human health... and incredibly difficult. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch has reached an area of 1.6 million square kilometers, according to estimates. There, it is accumulated about 1.8 billion plastic waste, according to the foundation, with an approximate weight of 80,000 tons. A significant percentage of plastics are trapped in eddies created by ocean currents, explains The.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (GPGP) is a large accumulation of marine debris in the Central North Pacific Ocean. The plastic debris from all large water bodies is broken down into tiny particles and moves with ocean currents' governance. The gyre is divided into two parts, Eastern Garbage Patch located between Hawaii and California. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an accumulation of trash floating in the Pacific Ocean between Japan and North America. The name can be deceiving though, because the patch is actually broken up into multiple trash vortexes; one close to Japan, and the other between Hawaii and California The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is just one of five major convergences that occur around the world where ocean currents create higher concentrations of trash. These so-called garbage patches don't have clearly defined borders: They shift and change all the time. They're not dense enough to walk on top of or see from space

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is located in the North Pacific Ocean and is a collection of marine debris. This debris has accumulated to an enormous size and is considered a serious threat to marine life in the Pacific Ocean. In discussing the Great Pacific Garbage Patch it is important to have a background of where it is, what it contains. Plastic Icebergs: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch. As if the novel coronavirus weren't enough, there's another invisible enemy lurking off our shores. Five giant spiral currents or gyres in oceans around the globe sweep in and trap floating debris. The largest gyre is home to a debris accumulation known as The Great Pacific Garbage.

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Snopes

  1. Aug 19, 2015 - Great Pacific Garbage Patch. See more ideas about great pacific garbage patch, save earth, garbage
  2. great pacific garbage patch size, was created to bring greater attention to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a mass of waste estimated to be the size of.
  3. Departing from San Francisco Bay last week, the cleanup system (System 001) will journey to the GPGP located halfway between Hawaii and California. The cleanup system will travel 240 nautical miles offshore for a two-week trial before continuing its journey toward the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, 1200 nautical miles offshore, to start the cleanup
  4. ALAMEDA — An innovative system aimed at sweeping up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — a massive vortex of plastic drifting between California and Hawaii — will be launched from Alameda.
  5. Browse 57 pacific ocean garbage patch stock photos and images available, or start a new search to explore more stock photos and images. Plastic sample jars. The ORV Alguita returns to Long beach after four months at sea sampling the waters of the great Pacific garbage patch' in the... Marine researcher Charles Moore holds an ocean water sample.

Also known as the Pacific Trash Vortex and Trash Island, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a slowly rotating mass of marine debris and trash that is 90 percent plastic and commonly described as twice the size of Texas.These small pieces of matter, individually anonymous and negligible, become nameable and significant only. Follow us by GPS. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is a collection of marine debris in the North Pacific Ocean. It is also known as the Pacific trash vortex and spans waters from the West Coast of North America to Japan. The patch is actually comprised of the Western Garbage Patch, located near Japan, and the Eastern Garbage Patch, located. The North Pacific is home to an enormous swirl of plastic waste twice the size of Texas known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, but how the trash made its way to the region has been a mystery. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch, also known as the plastic soup or the Pacific trash vortex, is a collection of human waste like plastic floating in the Pacific Ocean. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch spans waters from the West Coast of North America to Japan and covers an estimated surface area of 1.6 million square kilometers. For comparison, that is a floating dump twice the size of Texas. The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is the popular cause simply because its apparent. And sadly, but a symptom of the larger tragedy. paul314 October 2, 2019 06:32 A

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch The Ocean Cleanu

What is the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Great Pacific Garbage Patch is Worse Than We ThoughtNASA's Ocean Garbage Islands Simulation - YouTubeParadise Recycled: Architects Dream of Turning GreatThe Pacific Garbage Patch as art